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Pop Shoppe

By Matthew Thomson and Kendra Hart:

The Pop Shoppe was once a leading player in the Canadian soft drinks market, but changing market conditions and corporate mismanagement drove the company into bankruptcy in the early 1980s. In 2003, an entrepreneur purchased the rights to the brand, and was considering reintroducing it in the market on the idea that many Canadians would be as fond of the Pop Shoppe as he was. The challenge was significant: the new potential buyer had little experience in the beverage industry and limited funds for a brand revival, and consumer habits had changed in the many years since the brand died. Questions about market segments and brand positioning loomed large. Older consumers might embrace the reintroduction of the old brand, but did they comprise a sustainable market segment? Would older consumers be able to turn their children onto the brand? How true should the brand stay to its original concept? Was a new positioning strategy required to meet growth goals? Could enough consumer and retailer interest in Pop Shoppe be raised to make the brand succeed? This case lets students grapple with the difficult task of re-launching a once-iconic brand after a significant absence from the market. A B-case supplement to Pop Shoppe (A) deals with the entrepreneur’s decision in 2010 on whether to enter the U.S. carbonated soft drinks market. The B-case highlights important distinctions between two seemingly similar markets in an attempt to demonstrate that success is not always easy to replicate.

Unilever

Unilever in Brazil 1997-2007: Marketing Strategies for Low-Income Consumers (2004) INSEAD Case (Pacheco Guimaraes and Chandon)

Unilever is a solid leader in the Brazilian detergent powder market with an 81% market share. Laercio Cardoso must decide (1) whether Unilever should divert money from its premium brands to target the lower-margin segment of low-income consumers, (2) whether Unilever can reposition or extend one of its existing brands to avoid launching a new brand, and (3) what price, product, promotion, and distribution strategy would allow Unilever to deliver value to low-income consumers without cannibalizing its own premium brands too heavily.

Parfums Cacharel de L’Oréal

Parfums Cacharel de L’Oréal 1997-2007: Decoding and Revitalizing a Classic Brand (2014) INSEAD Case (Chandon, Nicholas, and Wertenbroch)

Parfums Cacharel, a division of L’Oréal, used to have a dominating position on the European market with both the number one and number two best-selling fragrances: Anaïs Anaïs and Loulou. At the time of the case however, sales were declining at a rate of 15 % per year and Cacharel was a fragance brand in need of a major revitalization. The task assigned to Dimitri Katsachnias, the new general manager of Cacharel, is to turn around the business. But before doing that, he needs to understand the brand. 1. Brand identity decoding ? What is Cacharel’s brand identity? What are its conceptual and tangible components? Can it be summarized in less than five words? ? Does the Cacharel umbrella brand itself have an identity beyond that of its sub-brands? Which sub-brands are mostly responsible for creating Cacharel’s identity? 2. Brand revitalization ? What is the root source of Cacharel’s maturity crisis and how can understanding the brand’s identity help? Should Kataschnias bring the Cacharel brand closer to where the market is now? Should he focus on meeting the desires of today’s consumers or in remaining faithful to the brand’s original identity?

Renova Toilet Paper

Renova Toilet Paper: Avant-garde Marketing in a Commoditized Category (2014) INSEAD Case (Yakov, Seabra de Sousa, Chandon, and Sweldens)

Renova, a Portuguese toilet paper manufacturer, is battling to survive in a stagnant, commoditised market dominated by international giants and private labels. To grow and remain independent, CEO Paulo Pereira da Silva is considering three options: 1) private label manufacturing, 2) new functional innovations, and 3) launching a black toilet paper. What should he do? And how should the chosen strategy be implemented?

One Fine Stay

One Fine Stay (2015) Harvard Business School Case (Jill Avery, Anat Keinan, and Liz Kind)

Miranda Cresswell, marketing director, and Greg Marsh, founder and CEO of onefinestay, were grappling with branding and positioning dilemmas. onefinestay offered high-end home rentals to travelers who sought a more authentic and local experience than a typical upscale hotel might provide. onefinestay’s brand had been “hacked” together quickly during the company’s early years. After five years of rapid growth, Marsh brought Cresswell on board to do a comprehensive analysis of the company’s brand and its positioning in the marketplace. Cresswell had spent several months gathering data and insights, and was starting to experiment with use case scenarios that took a crack at segmenting the company’s customers. The preliminary results were interesting, but raised more questions than they answered, and Cresswell wondered if this was the best way to segment the market. While segmenting in this way was intriguing, it led to a branding challenge – as a start-up, it was difficult for onefinestay to have the resources to support multiple brand messages in the marketplace and different segments wanted different things from their travel experience. She pondered whether there were other ways to group customers that would allow for a more universal positioning for the brand or whether the company needed to focus on one or two segments to serve. Positioning the fledgling brand was a challenge. Who was the company competing against and how could it carve out a unique value proposition that would appeal to travelers and be differentiated from what was offered by other hospitality options? Was its current moniker “the unhotel” working for or against it?